Aviation Sustainability and the Environment, CAPA 08-Jul-2021

Jamie Linger

Table of Contents London Southend Airport launches environmental action plan to reach carbon neutral operationsAGS Airports commits to net zero emissions by mid 2030sMuenster/Osnabrueck Airport launches emissions offsetting initiative for passengersClean Sky projects 11% reduction in global aircraft CO2 emissions by 2050 This CAPA report features a summary of recent […]

This CAPA report features a summary of recent aviation sustainability and environment news, selected from the 300+ news alerts published daily by CAPA. For more information, please contact us.

Delta Air Lines and Corporate Travel Management signed (01-Jul-2021) a three year sustainable aviation fuel agreement to reduce lifecycle emissions by 209 metric tons of carbon dioxide.

This is partnership is the first multi year SAF commitment for Delta and expands on a growing list of travel management companies and corporate partners the carrier is adding gradually.

In total, 300,000 gallons of SAF have been purchased in collaboration with Delta’s corporate partners.

Delta Air Lines MD sustainability Amelia DeLuca stated: “These partnerships are a core driver for decreasing the aviation industry’s reliance on conventional jet fuel and encouraging the economic viability of SAF by building industry demand and supply”.

Ms DeLuca said the collective impact the carrier is making in conjunction with corporate partners “delivers real change for the industry”. [more – original PR]

Original report: Delta signs first multi-year SAF agreement with CTM, reaches collective purchase of 300,000 gallons

Delta Air Lines, the first carbon neutral airline on a global basis, and Corporate Travel Management (CTM), an award-winning global travel management company, have signed a multi-year sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) agreement. The three-year deal will reduce lifecycle emissions by 209 metric tons of carbon dioxide, which is equivalent to the amount of carbon sequestered by 256 acres of U.S. forests. This partnership is the first multi-year SAF commitment for Delta and builds on the growing list of travel management companies and corporate partners that share in Delta’s commitment to bolster the future of sustainable air travel.

Delta signs first multi-year SAF agreement with CTM, reaches collective purchase of 300,000 gallons with corporate partners

In total, 300,000 gallons of SAF have been purchased in collaboration with Delta’s corporate partners. This means life cycle emissions from Delta operations will be reduced by 2,100 metric tons, which is equivalent to removing 457 passenger vehicles from the roads for one year.

“These partnerships are a core driver for decreasing the aviation industry’s reliance on conventional jet fuel and encouraging the economic viability of SAF by building industry demand and supply,” said Delta’s Amelia DeLuca, Managing Director – Sustainability. “The collective impact we are making with our corporate partners delivers real change for the industry.”  

With a future vision of zero-impact aviation, Delta’s first step is to solve for its largest impact on the environment—carbon dioxide emissions. To do so, it is investing in the readily available resources that can make a difference today, like SAF, which has limited supply and a ticket price 3-5 times that of conventional jet fuel. It is why partnerships like the one with CTM are necessary.

“CTM is committed to developing and supporting initiatives that provide practical and sustainable benefits to businesses, the environment and local communities,” said Kevin O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer of Corporate Travel Management North America. “We are proud to take this next long-term step alongside Delta in supporting the lasting sustainability of our planet by reducing the impact of business travel on the environment.”

SAF is a critically important lever in Delta’s Flight to Net ZeroSM as it reduces the life cycle carbon emissions from aviation fuel. In its pure form, it can reduce life cycle carbon emissions up to 80 percent compared to petroleum-based jet fuel. The collaboration with BCD Travel, CWT, Deloitte, Nike, Takeda and now CTM underscore the significant positive environmental impact that can be achieved through collaboration.

London Southend Airport launches environmental action plan to reach carbon neutral operations

London Southend Airport launched (06-Jul-2021) an environmental action plan with the following priorities:

  • Progress toward carbon neutral airport operation;
  • Ensure air quality around airport continues to be within government limits;
  • Minimise number of households impacted by noise and phase out all aircraft over 85 decibels;
  • Ensure efficient water use and manage impact on local watercourses;
  • Play leading role in supporting employment, education and community care in the Southend area, developing education and skills initiatives to support local residents into work.

The airport is also creating a community forum to address the impact of aircraft noise on the community. [more – original PR]

Original report: London Southend Airport launches ‘Connecting the Community’ commitment

London Southend Airport launches ‘Connecting the Community’ commitment

The commitment, which will include a number of milestones across the coming weeks, months and years, will encompass a formal plan for its environmental commitments, a local charity partner, plans for a community forum that will listen to and engage with local concerns.

Updates will be made available within this section of the website under the relevant headings below.

The pillars of the commitment ensure the airport;

• Places environmental responsibility at the core of its operations

• Engages regularly with the community on key issues such as noise

• Consistently delivers community benefits alongside a local charity partner

Environmental Action Plan (EAP)

The airport has evaluated how it can grow sustainably and how that can benefit the community. It has commissioned research that indicates an airport with 3 million passengers for example, can support 3,200 jobs for local people both directly and indirectly and contribute £400 million to the UK economy. But it’s important that the airport delivers that growth responsibly. That’s why London Southend Airport is also setting out an Environmental Action Plan.

Its key priorities for sustainable growth are to:

• Progress toward a carbon neutral airport operation

• Ensure air quality around the airport continues to be within government limits

• Minimise the number of households impacted by noise and phase out all aircraft over 85 decibels

• Ensure efficient water use and manage impact on local watercourses

• Play a leading role in supporting employment, education and community care in the Southend area, developing education and skills initiatives to support local residents into work

To view the Environmental Action Plan please click here.

Community Forum

London Southend Airport is very aware of the impact that aircraft noise has on local people. It is therefore creating a Community Forum, which will include representatives from the local community, and will be appointing an independent chairperson to lead the meetings. That forum will aim to identify actionable solutions and make genuine progress.

Charity Partner

London Southend Airport will also be announcing its new community charity partner and be providing details of how the collaboration will benefit people in the local community.

AGS Airports commits to net zero emissions by mid 2030s

AGS Airports launched (30-Jun-2021) a sustainability strategy aimed at achieving net zero emissions by the mid 2030s, including the following commitments:

  • Achieving net zero;
    • Promotion of sustainable aviation fuels;
    • Promotion of hydrogen and electric flights;
    • Transition to ultra low emission fleet;
    • Continuation of electric charging infrastructure roll out;
  • Supporting communities;
    • Work with partners including the National Health Service to trial the UK‘s first medical drone distribution network;
    • Work with local communities, schools, colleges and universities to provide training and internship opportunities;
  • Supporting AGS’ people;
    • Align policies and processes with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights;
    • Work with Slave Free Alliance to review approach to modern slavery and develop and publish an action plan;
    • Establish supplier code of conduct;
    • Implement gender equality strategy.

AGS Airports CEO Derek Provan stated: “As we seek to regrow and restore the connectivity that will help drive Scotland’s and the UK’s recovery post-COVID, we will balance the undoubted social and economic benefits of aviation with our climate change responsibilities”. 

AGS Airports owns Aberdeen International Airport, Glasgow International Airport and Southampton Airport. [more – original PR]

Original report: AGS AIRPORTS COMMITS TO NET ZERO AS PART OF NEW SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGY

AGS Airports, which owns Aberdeen International, Glasgow and Southampton airports, has committed to achieving net zero for its direct emissions by the mid-2030s as part of its new sustainability strategy which it launched today (Wednesday 30 June).

Sustainability | Aberdeen Airport

Scotland’s Minister for Transport, Graeme Dey MSP, joined AGS’ Chief Executive, Derek Provan, to launch the strategy which sets out how AGS will balance the undoubted social and economic benefits of aviation with its climate change responsibilities.

All three AGS airports achieved carbon neutrality status in 2020 and the group has now set a roadmap for its transition to net zero by the mid-2030s which will involve the decarbonisation of AGS’ infrastructure.

The strategy, which is anchored in the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, sets commitments against a wide range of material issues including decarbonisation, biodiversity, modern slavery, circular economy, community support and how it will support its people. Commitments include:

Achieving net zero

  • AGS will maintain its commitment to carbon neutrality as it delivers its net zero roadmap to achieve net zero carbon for direct emissions by the mid-2030s.
  • AGS will support the continued development of Sustainable Aviation’s Decarbonisation roadmap including the promotion of Sustainable Aviation Fuels, hydrogen and electric flight.
  • AGS will transition its fleet of vehicles to ultra-low emission vehicles and will continue the roll-out of electric charging infrastructure.

Supporting communities

  • AGS will continue to invest in its community funds which have awarded over £2 million to local community groups and charitable organisations since 2010.
  • AGS will work with partners, including the NHS, to trial the UK’s first medical drone distribution network.
  • AGS will work with local communities, schools, colleges and universities to provide training and internship opportunities.

Supporting its people

  • AGS will align policies and processes with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.
  • AGS will work with the Slave Free Alliance to review its approach to modern slavery and develop and publish an action plan, in addition to establishing a supplier code of conduct.
  • AGS will implement a gender equality strategy with objectives focused on flexible working, pay equality and gender composition.

Derek Provan, Chief Executive of AGS Airports, said: “At AGS we have always been acutely aware that operating such important pieces of infrastructure comes with responsibilities; to our people, to our communities and to the environment. As we seek to regrow and restore the connectivity that will help drive Scotland’s and the UK’s recovery post-COVID, we will balance the undoubted social and economic benefits of aviation with our climate change responsibilities.

“We have made significant progress in addressing our own environmental impacts however, we recognise there is more work to do. In 2020 we became carbon neutral which is an important first step towards our ultimate goal of achieving net zero carbon for our direct emissions by the mid-2030s. Whilst this is a central pillar of our strategy, our sustainability commitments go beyond the decarbonisation of AGS. We want to create shared value and ensure our communities can share in our success as we seek to rebuild.

“In November, the world will look to Glasgow when we host the United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP26. This will be the opportunity for governments to agree a global response to what is a truly global challenge. At AGS, we are committed to working with governments to ensure we play our role in addressing the climate emergency whilst supporting economic and social development in the regions we serve.”

Scotland’s Minister for Transport Graeme Dey said: “I’m delighted to see AGS Airports lay out their plans to reduce emissions across their sites and play their part in helping Scotland achieve our ambitious climate change targets.

“I warmly welcome their commitment to achieving net-zero carbon for direct emissions by the mid-2030s and working with the wider aviation sector to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2045.

“Working together, Government and the aviation industry can look to create a future in which we enjoy the social and economic benefits of air travel without having an impact on the environment.”

In 2020, AGS Airports was recognised as an “airport transport sector lead” for its sustainability performance by the Global Real Estate Sustainability Benchmark (GRESB) which assesses the Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) performance of real estate and infrastructure portfolios.

Glasgow was ranked as the best performing airport in the world by GRESB. Together with Aberdeen it received a five-star rating for its sustainability performance, and both were recognised as “airport transport sector leads.”

Glasgow, Aberdeen and Southampton were ranked first, second and third respectively within both the UK and European Transport: Airport Companies categories. In the same worldwide category, Glasgow was ranked first, Aberdeen second and Southampton sixth.

Muenster/Osnabrueck Airport launches emissions offsetting initiative for passengers

Muenster/Osnabrueck Airport launched (30-Jun-2021) an initiative for passengers to offset carbon emissions by contributing to local sustainability projects.

Passengers can find details about the projects and contribute on the airport’s official website. [more – original PR – German]

Original Report: Neues Umweltprojekt am FMO: Flugreisen lokal kompensieren

Der Flughafen Münster/Osnabrück (FMO) arbeitet mit großem Engagement daran, ein Green Airport zu werden. Als Ziel wurde ausgegeben, dass der FMO als einer der ersten Airports in Deutschland bis spätestens 2030 seinen Betrieb komplett CO2-neutral gestaltet. Der Klimaschutz hört für den FMO aber nicht beim Flughafenbetrieb auf. Unsere Mobilität hinterlässt Spuren, und obwohl Flugreisen nur ca. drei Prozent des weltweiten CO2-Ausstoßes ausmachen, wollen immer mehr Fluggäste bewusst einen eigenen Beitrag zum Klimaschutz leisten. Daher hat der FMO gemeinsam mit der Naturschutzstiftung des Kreises Steinfurt und dem Natur- und Geopark Terra.Vita eine Möglichkeit geschaffen, dass Fluggäste ihren Flug unabhängig von der Fluggesellschaft lokal auf der Internetseite des FMO kompensieren können.

Projekt 1:

Naturschutzstiftung des Kreises Steinfurt

Die Naturschutzstiftung legt mit den Mitteln der Fluggäste einen Klimaschutzwald im Bergeshöveder Feld in Hörstel/Riesenbeck an. Eine rund 5.000 m²-Fläche des insgesamt 1,9 ha großen Areals steht ausschließlich FMO-Fluggästen zur Verfügung. Dort wird die Anpflanzung eines naturnahen Laubwaldes mit standortheimischen Bäumen durchgeführt sowie blütenreiche Waldränder aus Sträuchern und Säumen geschaffen, die allesamt einen artenreichen Lebensraum für Pflanzen und Tiere bieten. Fluggäste haben auch die Möglichkeit, bei den regelmäßig durchgeführten Aufforstungsaktionen mitzuwirken.

Projekt 2:

Terra.Vita, Natur- und Geopark

Das Projekt von Terra.Vita und der Naturschutzbehörde des Landkreises Osnabrück umfasst die Vernässung des Naturschutzgebietes Dievenmoor. Das 220 ha große Dievenmoor zählt zu den letzten Resten des Großen Moores. Moore sind die wichtigsten CO2-Speicher der Erde und können durch Vernässungsmaßnahmen einen wichtigen Beitrag zum Klimaschutz leisten. Terra.Vita wird die Beiträge der Fluggäste dafür nutzen, um den großen Vorfluter zu verschließen und zu verlegen, damit Regenwasser im Moor gehalten werden kann. Außerdem soll in einem zweiten Schritt das Verfüllen von Handtorfstichen und kleinen Gräben mit moortypischen Substanzen zur Wiedervernässung führen.

Auf der Internetseite des FMO gelangt man unter www.fmo.de/green-airport zu den beiden Projekten. Dort gibt es Verlinkungen, um seinen Beitrag, z.B. per Paypal, direkt an den jeweiligen Umweltverband zu leisten. Für einen Flug mit einer Entfernung, z.B. nach München, Mallorca oder Bari, wird ein Beitrag von 5 bis 15 EUR empfohlen. Für weiter entfernte Ziele, wie die Kanarischen Inseln oder die Türkei, ein Beitrag von 15 bis 50 EUR und für einen interkontinentalen Flug zwischen 50 und 100 EUR. Diese Beiträge sind aber nur Empfehlungen, jeder Fluggast kann selbst bestimmen, ob und in welcher Höhe man mitmachen möchte. Die Naturschutzprojekte freuen sich über jede Zuwendung.

Clean Sky projects 11% reduction in global aircraft CO2 emissions by 2050

Clean Sky reported (05-Jul-2021) the following findings of its Global Impact Assessment of Regulations and Polices for Sustainable Aviation by 2050 (GLIMPSE2050) project:

  • Assuming Clean Sky 2 will also have matured sustainable aviation technology in operation by 2050, regulations and policies designed to make aviation more sustainable could reduce global CO2 emissions from aircraft by 11% and NOX emissions by 14%;
  • Policies and regulations on ATM modernisation, wake energy retrieval and fuel and ticket based taxes appeared to be the dominant contributors to emissions reductions;
  • The selected regulations and policies tend to decrease the number of flights and the number of aircraft kilometres flown, reduce fleet size (with an increased share of Clean Sky 2 concept aircraft) and increase the share of long haul flights.

The GLIMPSE2050 project consortium consisted of the Royal Netherlands Aerospace Centre with the German Aerospace Centre as the topic manager and leader of the technology evaluator. [more – original PR]

Original report: GLIMPSE2050: How regulation can reduce aviation’s environmental footprint

A slew of regulations and policies are currently under discussion to try to reduce aviation’s environmental impact. But the debates around these policies are complex: what are the best policies to implement? Which ones are most likely to be implemented? When? Will they contribute to the ambitious targets set by the European Green Deal? And finally, how effective will these policies be?

They could be pretty effective, according to research carried out by Clean Sky’s GLIMPSE2050 (Global Impact Assessment of Regulations and Polices for Sustainable Aviation by 2050) project. 

Assuming that Clean Sky 2 would also have matured sustainable aviation technology that would be in operation by 2050, the GLIMPSE2050 team revealed that regulations and policies designed to make aviation more sustainable could reduce global CO2 emissions from aircraft by 11% and NOX emissions by 14%.

They found that the policies and regulations on ATM modernisation, wake energy retrieval, and fuel and ticket-based tax appeared to be the dominant contributors to these reductions. Further, the results suggest that the selected regulations and policies tend to decrease the number of flights and number of flown aircraft-kilometres, reduce fleet size (with an increased share of Clean Sky 2 concept aircraft), and increase the share of long-haul flights. 

The GLIMPSE2050 project took a 4-step approach to reach their conclusions. First of all, they conducted an in-depth literature review compiling information from governmental organisations (e.g. EU and ICAO) and non-governmental and trade organisations (e.g. IATA, ATAG, and ICCT) as well as publications in media (e.g. Aviation Week, EURACTIV, and Flight Global).

Next, a series of environmental impact indicators were selected and monitored, such as the total amount of CO2 and NOX emitted by the aircraft fleet worldwide.

Thirdly, an assessment approach was set up using forecasts on fleet and movements up to 2050 provided by the Technology Evaluator. These forecasts were based on autonomous economic, demographical and technological developments, but without any of the selected regulations and policies.

GLIMPSE2050 fine-tuned EASA’s and ICAO-CAEP endorsed tool AERO-MS to fit with the selected regulations and policies, while matching the fleet and movements forecasts provided by the Technology Evaluator.

Finally, GLIMPSE2050 carried out the environmental-impact assessment of the selected regulations and policies. Every regulation and policy was assessed individually first, and then as part of selected groups of regulations and policies. Finally, GLIMPSE2050 assessed all the regulations and policies combined, and came to the conclusion of a 11% reduction in CO2 and a 14% reduction in NOx. Assuming that Clean Sky 2’s innovative technologies would also be in the skies by 2050, GLIMPSE2050 found that there were significant environmental gains. 

At the end of the project, a workshop was held to disseminate the results of GLIMPSE2050. Participants at the workshop included key stakeholders as well as the European institutions. 

The project consortium consisted of the Royal Netherlands Aerospace Centre (NLR) with the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) as the topic manager and leader of the Technology Evaluator. The budget was € 193,670.

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